First Lines Friday

I have never participated in this weekly feature before, but after noticing several bloggers take part, I thought to give it a go. The feature, hosted by @Wandering Words, revolves around giving away only the first few lines of a novel and then letting readers guess the title, plus of course the author. The little game, I suppose, is most relevant to those readers who read a lot among several genres, and it tests their ability to remember the first chapter of their past reads.

That said, here goes mine for this week.

WHEN WE GOT THE LETTER in the post, my mother was ecstatic. She had already decided that all our problems were solved, gone forever. The big hitch in her brilliant plan was me. I didn’t think I was a particularly disobedient daughter, but this was where I drew the line.

I didn’t want to be royalty. And I didn’t want to be a One…

The answer is THE SELECTION by Kierra Cass,

A novel I read only last week and found it quite entertaining even though the prose wasn’t as polished. A full review is on it’s way. Just watch this space.

Throwback Thursday

Throwback Thursday

 

 

I’m glad to say it’s my first time to participate in this amazing feature, and I probably will continue to do so—because we all love old things, don’t we?

Let me kick off this week with The Death Cure, by James Dashner, the third installment in his amazing Maze Runner series

I have been meaning to read this final book of the Maze Runner saga for years but then never had the time for it, as I got swamped in other things. But now that I have gotten to, I am getting mixed feelings. I loved the first two books but that was years ago even before the movies came out, but now I’m sad to say the third one isn’t living up to the hype.

The Death Cure starts with the M/C Thomas holed up in some prison-like white room, trying to recall the events that led him to be there. The cure for the Flare, the deadly virus that leads to all the experimenting with humans that’s the subject of this novel series, is yet to be found, but Thomas is told by his informer that salvation is near, and what’s left is just a little more simulation and then the ordeal will be over.

A novel in which terrible things are done to children for the sake of saving the greater society might make for an engaging read, but I think by the time the story gets to The Death Cure the power of this plot gimmick has waned considerably. I found it difficult to stay interested in what WICKED was trying to achieve, or feel any connection with what the main characters were striving for.

 

James Dashner is a great writer however, and his prose is up there with the very best and even though I wasn’t too taken with this one, I will always seriously consider any new works he may publish.